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Posts Tagged ‘race relations’

Celebrities, News Anchors And More Share When They Realized They Were Black (Video)

I remember growing up how ‘tough kids’ would always remark and bark about how they would have fought if ‘massuh’ hit them with a whip back in slavery times. Even then I knew that was nonsense, bravado, untestable braggadocio bullsh!t. A whip would make a 1500-pound bull jump; not much fight in anybody AFTER getting hit.

Fight BEFORE, or run away. Yeah, back back in the day, I knew I would have played it ‘smart’ like that. But watching this… this is within these folks’ lifetimes, some even younger than me… These stories are NOT whip lashes, but Whites lashing out against my people in the vilest ways. Inhumanely… like they were acting to deny or strip away their humanity. And soon after the clip above started to play, I felt like I would have responded the way Jason George did – blacked out with rage #BlackOutRage

In “The Souls of Black Folk,” W.E.B. Du Bois talks about the first time he realized his skin color made him different. We asked celebrities, CNN anchors and reporters, and others to tell us when they first realized that being Black affected how people treated them. Share your own story with #RealizedIWasBlack

But I must say, making it to the end made me think of when I realized I was Black. I then realized that I don’t have an awful story to share. You see, I’m from Tuskegee. I was raised there. I grew up steeped in Black History. Loved on, scolded, chastised, challenged (by well-meaning adults and bullies) that were Black. Hell, being light-skinned, I was the guy who got ‘janked’ (meaning ‘joned’ or ‘cracked on’ or whatever your word for verbal hazing is) for being damn near White.

However, I was taught my history; ALL of it, MYstory, not HIStory. And I was imbued with a certain forgive-if-you-can-but-NEVER-forget attitude that persists today. I am sure that is why I often toss a ‘Black History’ lecture into conversations… Which likely why I often proclaim, “I’m from ‘Skegee, and that makes me the Blackest man in the room.” My upbringing and attitude is what steels my nerve and puts a fire in my belly when I watch or hear or read anything about how Black folks are mistreated – by individuals or institutions. I am usually able to channel my #BlackOutrage (see what I did there? #BlackOutRage to #BlackOutrage hash flip) positively… to fight negativity nowadays. But I also KNOW that is because my ancestors took the lashes, took the lynchings, took the billy club beatings… picked the cotton, picked their battles, put up with losses, pushed through struggles, put in ballots, and punted White Power in its azz to get them out and make Tuskegee the Black Mecca of my youth (Google ‘Gomillion v. Lightfoot‘). So while I do not have a story to share like those in the clip above, I feel them. I really feel them as they are told.

That said, I do remember that White security guy that used to follow my brothers and me around the grocery store when we were kids like we might shoplift. But he was a weirdo.

Watch the clip above. Compelling! Follow the link to CNN for even more.

MORE: I REALIZED I WAS BLACK (CNN)

@ojones1

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Cenk Uygur Speaks On How Muhammad Ali Should Truly Be Remembered (Video)

Muhammad Ali… He was a strong, proud Black man and he didn’t mind telling you…
Cenk Uygur

Powerful! Cenk Uygur gives us 5 minutes of RAW commentary to set (or keep) perspectives straight on the legacy of Ali. Don’t let all the soft, lofty words now being spoken about The Greatest in this time of mourning make you think Ali was whitewashed or weak (or even worried about being ‘liked’) in any way at any time in his life.

Muhammad Ali has been described as transcending race, but that takes away from his powerful stance on being a Black man. Cenk Uygur, host of The Young Turks, delivers his Final Judgment on Muhammad Ali’s legacy.

It is important that for all the ways that Ali should be remembered – winning fighter, charismatic public figure, ambassador for peace and justice – we must NEVER forget that Ali was NOT living to win approval from the majority. As much a warrior out of the ring as in, he spoke harshly on injustices perpetuated by America and the White majority in the U.S. and abroad; refusing to be part of or tacitly endorse it in any way.

Good to keep that straight.

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Neshoba: The Price of Freedom (Documentary Trailer)

“Neshoba: The Price of Freedom”¬†tells the story of a Mississippi town still divided about the meaning of justice, 40 years after the murders of civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, an event dramatized in the Oscar-winning film, “Mississippi Burning.” Although Klansmen bragged about what they did in 1964, no one was held accountable until 2005, when the State indicted preacher Edgar Ray Killen, an 80-year-old notorious racist and mastermind of the murders. Through exclusive interviews with Killen, intimate interviews with the victims’ families, and candid interviews with Black and White Neshoba County citizens still struggling with their town’s violent past, the film explores whether the prosecution of one unrepentant Klansman constitutes justice and whether healing and reconciliation are possible without telling the unvarnished truth.

NESHOBA: THE PRICE OF FREEDOM (DVD ORDER LINK)

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